7 Crazy Facts About Golden Retriever Lifespans (And 7 Tips To Increase It) – Golden Hearts

7 Crazy Facts About Golden Retriever Lifespans (And 7 Tips To Increase It)


golden retriever lifespan

Want to know how long golden retrievers live?

In this post, you’ll learn the average lifespan for golden retrievers.

And not only that, but I’m also going to share with you 7 tips to help your golden live a long and happy life and hopefully increase that life expectancy!

Ready to give your golden the longest, healthiest life possible?

Let’s dive in!

Fact #1: Golden Retrievers Live An Average Of 10-12 Years

The average golden retriever lifespan is 10-12 years, which is about the same as other breeds of dogs their size.

For comparison, German shepherds live between 7-10 years, and labradors live between 10-12 years.

Smaller breeds typically live longer lives (Yorkies live an average of 11-15 years), while larger breeds typically live shorter lives (Great Danes live an average of 7-10 years).

Of course, these are just averages, and many dogs live longer or shorter lives than these ranges.

Fact #2: The Oldest Golden Retriever Is 20 Years Old

average golden retriever lifespan

Augie, a golden retriever who lives in Tennessee, is currently the oldest golden retriever at 20 years old.

She was born on April 24, 2000.

Learn more about Augie here.

Fact #3: 60% Of Golden Retrievers Are Impacted By Cancer

One of the biggest causes of death for golden retrievers is cancer.

According to the Morris Animal Foundation Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, 60% of golden retrievers are impacted by cancer.

This is about double the rate of any other breed of dog.

Fact #4: 3,000 Golden Retrievers Are Participating In A Study To Help Increase Golden Retriever Health

The Morris Animal Foundation launched the Golden Retriever Lifetime Study in 2012.

Together with veterinarians and the participating golden retrievers and their owners, they’re collecting data about their health, environment, and behavior to find potential risk factors for cancer and other diseases.

Fact #5: Golden Retrievers Suffer From These Health Issues Most Commonly

golden retriever lifespan tips

Here are some of the most common golden retriever health issues:

  • Hip and elbow dysplasia
  • Hypothyroidism
  • Sub-aortic stenosis (SAS)
  • Eye disorders
  • Mast cell tumors
  • Seizures
  • Lymphoma
  • Osteosarcoma
  • Hemangiosarcoma
  • Skin problems

Don’t worry, in the next section, we’ll show you how to prevent these!

Fact #6: Golden Retrievers Are “Puppies For Life”

Most golden retriever owners say their goldens are “puppies for life.”

Their playful puppy attitudes often last well past their puppy years, so if you have a golden at home be ready for a lifetime of fun!

Fact #7: Golden Retrievers Faces Turn Gray Or White As They Age

golden retriever life expectancy

Whenever you see a gray-faced golden retriever it’s fun to think about how many smiles they’ve sparked, or how many happy faces they’ve licked.

Although a gray face may give one indication of a golden’s age, their playful demeanor usually says otherwise.

7 Tips To Increase Your Golden Retriever’s Lifespan

This next section will cover seven tips to help increase your golden retriever’s life expectancy.

Of course, they aren’t foolproof, but they will give your dog the best shot possible at having a long and healthy life.

Tip #1: To Have A Healthy Dog, Start With Healthy Parents

english cream golden retriever mom and puppy

The best way for you to get a healthy dog is to purchase one from a good breeder.

Yes, you may pay more for a high-quality puppy, but it will be worth it.

Do your research on breeders, ask about their dogs’ health histories, their temperaments, and what they’re bred for.

Unfortunately, many people are breeding dogs with money as their #1 priority, not their puppies’ health.

Tip #2: Feed Your Dog A Quality Dog Food

Like choosing a breeder, dog food is definitely not something you want to go cheap on.

Plus, if you pay a little more upfront for food, you’ll likely save down the line in vet bills.

When trying to decide which food to feed your golden retriever, check out this article about puppy food and this article about adult food.

And read this to learn more about how much it costs to feed golden retrievers.

Tip #3: Groom Your Golden Regularly

golden retriever average life expectancy

Maintaining your golden retriever’s coat, nails, paws, teeth, and ears can not only keep them looking sharp, but also keep them healthy.

By not brushing their teeth, they can be at a greater risk to develop dental diseases, and by not cleaning their ears, they can develop ear infections.

Grooming them also gives you a chance to check them for lumps or painful spots.

Tip #4: Exercise Your Golden Retriever Regularly

how long do golden retrievers live

Like people, dogs benefit from regular exercise.

It keeps their bones, muscles, and heart strong, as well as keeps their potty habits regular.

Good forms of exercise include walks, swimming, playing fetch, and playing with other dogs.

It also helps a lot with tip #5…

Tip #5: Keep Your Golden Retriever’s Weight Under Control

Golden retrievers love to eat, so they do have a tendency to become overweight if they’re overfed.

Since they’re already susceptible to joint and heart issues, you definitely don’t want them to gain too much weight.

To keep their weight under control make sure that they get enough exercise and are fed the proper amount.

For males, golden retrievers should weigh between 65-75 pounds, and for females, they should weigh between 55-65 pounds.

Tip #6: Have A Good Relationship With Your Vet

Having a relationship where you talk about what’s going on in your dog’s life will help them get to know your dog and care for them the best they can.

They’ll be able to tell you what’s best for your pup so that they’re living up to their healthiest potential.

Tip #7: Fix Your Dog, But Not Too Early

According to this research article, dogs that are fixed may live longer than those who are not.

And, according to this article, dogs that are fixed a little later in life (after their first heat cycle for females and between 12-24 months for males) may be better off than dogs who are fixed too early (usually around 6 months old).

Interestingly enough, there’s also evidence that suggests “fixed” men may live longer than “intact” men, if we’re using canine terms here.

I’ll let you decide how you want to process that information!

Conclusion

expected golden retriever lifespan

Although the golden retriever life expectancy is between 10-12 years, this often varies and goldens can live longer or shorter lives.

To help them live as long as possible, follow these 7 tips:

  1. Choose a good breeder
  2. Feed your dog a high-quality food
  3. Groom them regularly
  4. Exercise them regularly
  5. Keep their weight under control
  6. Have a good relationship with your vet
  7. Fix your dog, but not too early

Have any more questions about golden retriever lifespans?

Have you had goldens before? How long did they live?

Let me know in the comments below!

And if you liked this article, you’ll love these 63 facts about golden retrievers!

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Jake & Oliver

Jake (the human) and Oliver (thinks he's a human) are the two behind Golden Hearts. Jake believes that golden retrievers are the best dogs, and that you should always check your poop bags for holes. Oliver believes every day is the best day. Learn more about Jake & Oliver here.

5 thoughts on “7 Crazy Facts About Golden Retriever Lifespans (And 7 Tips To Increase It)

  1. Our Golden is 12.5 years and got a clean bill of health yesterday from the vet. Neutered him at 14 months, raw feed him, exercise him, work to keep his weight down (he loves food!) and keep him well loved! Fortunately no cancer. He has SAS- a breeder had dumped him when she realized she couldn’t sell him, so his genes are not great. But we have done all we could to give him as long a life as possible and he is still here. He is slower in the summer heat, but so am I!

  2. That article about early spay/neuter is 10 years old and I haven’t seen any more recent research. Have you seen anything more recent or less anecdotal? My female pup is only 5 months and I plan to wait until she is at least 12 – 18 months….

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